Positive wine cancer research for women:
Can drinking red wine prevent breast cancer?

Wine cancer link: RED WINE HELPS WARD OFF BREAST CANCER

There's a positive wine cancer link that researchers are now unlocking...

Medical science has long ago linked alcohol consumption to an increased risk of breast cancer in women, along with many other types of cancers and degenerative diseases where diet and lifestyle choices play a critical role in long term health and longevity. 

But women wine lovers can rejoice - red wine is proving to be the star exception to the rule. 

Moderate, yet consistent consumption of red wine not only offers the beneficial antioxidant punch of resveratrol and other phytonutrients, is also helps inhibit the growth of cancer cells in the breast, recent studies are finding.

Breast cancer can occur when the hormone androgen converts into estrogen in an unchecked manner in the body. 

This hormonal imbalance in the body thus creates effective grounds for cancer to take root because estrogen, which of course in balanced supply is vital to women’s health, can also begin generating cancer cells when it proliferates out of control. 

That’s where red wine comes in, with an army of what is called aromatase inhibitors. Aromatase inhibitors have been found to block the critical enzyme aromatase, which turns androgen into estrogen in the first place. 

Dr. Glenn Braunstein, a researcher at Cerdars-Sinai tested his hypothesis that red wine offers more aromatase inhibitors than white wine. While that has still gone unproven, Braustein says that “The evidence is supportive of red wine having a positive effect on the hormonal milieu, making it less conducive to simulating growth of breast cancer cells. 

Braunstein with his team conducted a study by providing 8 ounces of red wine daily to 36 women participants, and 8 ounces of white wine daily to another group of 36 women participants. 

After the first month, the two groups reversed the wine, and blood samples were collected bi-monthly to measure and monitor the womens hormone levels throughout the study.

When women from either group were drinking red wine, hormonal levels were balanced and generally more favorable to health and well being. 

The study concludes that “these data suggest that red wine is an aromatase inhibitor and may explain the observation that red wine does not appear to increase breast cancer risk. 

While recent studies on the matter have proven inconclusive, the research scientists are quick to note that red wine consumption greatly balances out a women’s hormones to healthy levels, in comparison to white wine which has displayed no such advantage. 

So while it is too strong and too early to say that red wine helps ‘fight’ breast cancer, it certainly helps prevent cancer by effectively re-balancing hormones in a woman’s body, and inhibiting the proliferation of cancer-producing biological conditions. 

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› Positive Wine Cancer Findings

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